wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Ghost Photographs by Angela Deane

With her genius ghost photographs, Angela Deane explores the beautiful, painful, and ultimately puzzling, human condition of having memories.

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wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Melting Words by Kotama Bouabane

Toronto-based photographer Kotama Bouabane has an incredibly poignant series called “Melting Words.”

The ice letters form typical break-up phrases, with their indelible messages transcending the medium’s own impermanence.

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so awesome when your prof’s work comes up on your dashboard. oh ocad, i miss you already.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 lula aldunate  radiates mandalas with ornate ceramic plates

new york city based artist and designer lula aldunate has photographed a hand-crafted a series, comprised of vibrantly colored and intricately pattered mandalas. the spiritual spirals are a ritual symbol in hinduism and buddhism, which represent the universe. here, aldunate has recreated the circular motif from ornately decorated tableware, deftly intermingling various colors, botanical prints, plate size and trim. gold leaf overlaps neon pinks perfectly, both unifying and juxtaposing the compositions. the artist is a lover of flea markets, quirky details, colors and prints; thus, the her work always includes a vintage piece, as illustrated in the collection of antique arrangements.

(via asylum-art)

intersectionsofart-craft:

Carlie Woodworth
Tied
2013
Bowties and hair
Various sizes 
These bow ties are sewn throughout with real hair from the artist as well as her loved ones. The use of traditions taught and learned by women (specifically in Woodworth’s family) speaks to the use of feminine craft in regards to the typical relationship between women and long hair. 

intersectionsofart-craft:

Carlie Woodworth

Tied

2013

Bowties and hair

Various sizes 

These bow ties are sewn throughout with real hair from the artist as well as her loved ones. The use of traditions taught and learned by women (specifically in Woodworth’s family) speaks to the use of feminine craft in regards to the typical relationship between women and long hair. 

intersectionsofart-craft:

Carlie Woodworth
Knotted
2014
Fabric and hair
42” x 36”
This quilt displays the highly-detailed image of the artist’s own hair, sewn with a white eyelet backing. The layers are tied together using french knots as well as real hair. 

intersectionsofart-craft:

Carlie Woodworth

Knotted

2014

Fabric and hair

42” x 36”

This quilt displays the highly-detailed image of the artist’s own hair, sewn with a white eyelet backing. The layers are tied together using french knots as well as real hair. 

intersectionsofart-craft:

Naoise Dunne
Sister, Sister
2014
Digital on fabric
4” x 8” images 

A daisy-chain representing the generational story of Dunne’s grandmother and her sister, as well as Dunne and her own sister. The fabric speaks to materials and the archive. The images are sewn together using yarn. 

intersectionsofart-craft:

Naoise Dunne

Sister, Sister

2014

Digital on fabric

4” x 8” images 

A daisy-chain representing the generational story of Dunne’s grandmother and her sister, as well as Dunne and her own sister. The fabric speaks to materials and the archive. The images are sewn together using yarn. 

(Source: halfbunny, via f0rthebirds)

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

 Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees for Her Sculptures

Aganetha Dyck doesn’t necessarily create her own works of art, she essentially facilitates the process of art. Working in joint effort with endangered species number one, or so it feels, Aganetha Dyck’s collection of vintage porcelain figurines has been covered in a sticky honeycomb surface.
Hailing from Canada with a strong interest in environmental issues, Aganetha Dyck works with sculptures that are broken or damaged in some way. Working with beekeepers, the honeybees enhance what would have been discarded with their own unique patterns. Aganetha Dyck reveals, “I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail.” She encourages the process with wax and honey.

(Source: b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d &, via asylum-art)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Embroidered Portraits by Melissa Zexter

Melissa Zexter combines hand-stitched embroidery with photography. Using photographs she has taken herself, she sews onto them, irreversibly altering the image by adding a new layer. She uses an ancient form of art, embroidery, refracted through a modern one, photography, to create structured objects that are embodiments of both fragmentation and focused concentration. The sewn patterns and intricate puzzles are colored textured drawings, which serve as webs and grids over the photographs, providing another dimension to the images. The act of sewing onto photographs builds a sense of connection to a particular human experience while creating layers of narrative, texture, and patterned geometry over a flat surface. Her multi-dimensional portraits overflow with a sense of nostalgia and personal resonance.

(via asylum-art)

wetheurban:

ART: Double Exposure Oil Paintings by Horyon Lee

Korean artist Horyon Lee’s pieces are classified as paintings, although they look much closer to photography.

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wetheurban:

ART: Contemporary Embroidery Art by Ana Teresa Barboza

A beautiful mix of drawing, embroidery and photography is what makes the creations of Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza so special. Her older creations were more delicate, focusing on creating a balance between wildlife and the human race.

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Lee Price: American Figurative Realist Oil Painter

Yes, these are real paintings.

All though these amazing pieces of art might look like photographs, they are actually outstanding realistic oil paintings. Made by the American figurative painter Lee Price.

(via asylum-art)

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